Have you ever found yourself staring at the clouds?

Whenever I’m in the cockpit of the plane, I can’t help but think how lucky I am to be flying across the sky.

Clouds are formed when water vapor rises into the atmosphere and condenses onto small particles that become visible. They take different shapes depending on their height.

Knowing that safety always goes first, pilots need to know what different types of clouds mean.

High clouds are situated at a minimum of 7000 meters above the sea level, some examples are:

Cirrus

Whitish and see-through, they predict that the weather is getting cold.

cirrus

Cirrocumulus

Round shapped, they predict storms.

cirrocumulus

Cirrostratus

Very thin and long, they predict storms or warm fronts.

Cc un

Middle clouds are between 2000-7000 meters above the sea level. Some of the types are:

Altocumulus

Dense in layers or patches, they predict bad weather with rain or storms.

Altocumulus

Altostratus

Tend to be thin with denser layers, they predict light rain and drops in temperature.

ALTOSTRATUS

 

Low clouds, which are below 2000 meters:

Nimbostratus

Long and grey, they predict rain in summer and snow in winter.

MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Estratocúmulus

Different tones of grey, they predict good weather.

estratucumuls

Stratus

Different densities and shades of grey, they predict good weather.

stratus

Vertical clouds:

Cumulus

Big and grey, they predict heavy storms.

cumulus

Cumulonimbus

Massive grey clouds, they predict heavy storms and hailing.

cumulunimbus

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