Social greetings can be tricky when traveling to a new country. Should you shake hands, hug or avoid physical contact all together? Things can get very complicated, so I’ve put together a few examples that will show you how diverse non-verbal communications can be.

JAPON

The bower shows respect or appreciation by bending at the waist and keeping their arms hanging.

japon

INDIA

‘Namaste’, which has its origins in Hindu practice, means ‘I bow to you’. To perform it, you place your hands together and bow your head.

india

TIBET

Tibetans greet each other by sticking out their tongues. This tradition comes a belief that demons have black tongues and that’s what distinguish them from humans.

tibet

OMAN

Rubbings noses represents respect and pride and it is generally performed by men.

omanjpg

THAILAND

‘Wai’, a traditional way of greeting in Thailand, is very similar to ‘Namaste’.

tailandia

CHINA

The traditional bow, which is similar to the Japanese one, shows respect and appreciation.

china

PHILIPPINES

‘Mano’, which is similar to hand-kissing, is performed by young people as a sign of respect to elders.

filipinas

NEW ZEALAND

‘Hongi’ is a traditional Maori greeting in New Zealand and it’s done by pressing one’s nose and forehead to another person.

nuevazelanda

Comments

comments

Esta entrada también está disponible en español